Nand Kishor Contributor

Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc... ...

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Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc...

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Chatbot Or Not? Facebook Messenger Strategies Gain Modest Traction With Brands

By Nand Kishor |Email | Apr 26, 2017 | 7212 Views

Facebook's big bet on messenger bots was an oversell from the start.

What's shaking out now is a more reserved and perhaps more useful idea of what a bot can be and how a business can use it.

"Rather than having chatbots be 'the star of the show,' as was the implication last year, Facebook is shifting to offer 'bots as helpers,' which is a truer representation of where bots are today," said Rurik Bradbury, global head of research at LivePerson, an enterprise messaging tech company.

Aeromexico is a good example. Last year, the Mexican airline launched Aerobot to automate the simpler, more tedious aspects of customer service.

Roughly 80% of the questions coming into its call center - "When is my flight?" or "How do I change the name on my ticket?" - could be handled without a phone interaction.

"We're not trying to get rid of customer service agents," said Brian Gross, Aeromexico's VP of innovation. "We're clearing the easy questions and making the process of getting answers easier."

Aeromexico worked with two partners - machine-learning company IV.AI and bot creator Yalochat.com - to ingest historical data from all of its customer service channels, everything from tweets and Facebook chats to email history and the conversations customers had with reps through the soon-to-be retired web chat widget on Aeromexico's site.

Six months in, around 35,000 Aeromexico customers per month engage with Aerobot, and the bot's been able to reduce the time required to resolve a service query from 16 minutes to two. The bot also provides destination-related recommendations and a group booking feature.

Aerobot has its limitations, though. While the bot learns from interactions - it's able to respond, for example, when a familiar query is asked in a new way - it can get flummoxed by questions it hasn't been previously exposed to. When the bot is presented with a question it can't yet answer, the conversation is diverted to a live customer service rep.

Aeromexico and its partners are working on expanding the bot's repertoire by adding more questions and answers to its memory bank.

A disconnect still exists between the future-looking conception of bots as AI-powered self-learning virtual assistants with all the answers and the reality of bots as the most boring - but potentially the most helpful - person in the room.

They'll aid you in the execution of simple tasks, like easily inputting bank information, organizing emails, changing travel plans, scheduling meetings and aggregating links. But the ability to converse in natural language is still very much a work in progress.

Computers are often "confounded" by basic questions "because they don't understand the world around us," said Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer at F8 in San Jose last week. "With all of the promise of AI, the bots and assistants we have don't seem to be able to answer most of the questions we ask them." Read Morea

Source: AD Exchanger