satyamkapoor

I work at ValueFirst Digital Media Private Ltd. I am a Product Marketer in the Surbo Team. Surbo is Chatbot Generator Platform owned by Value First. ...

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I work at ValueFirst Digital Media Private Ltd. I am a Product Marketer in the Surbo Team. Surbo is Chatbot Generator Platform owned by Value First.

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To understand big data, convert it to sound

By satyamkapoor |Email | Mar 28, 2018 | 7377 Views

Some researchers exploring a radical concept say that humans are far better at figuring out data pattern changes audibly than they are able to do graphically in two dimensions. The researchers feel that servers full of big data can be far more comprehensible if the numbers are moved off computer screens or for that matter hard copies and sonified which means converted into sound.


They say this since while listening to music, nuances almost jump out at you for instance a bad note. In fact some researchers at Virginia Tech say the same thing is may be applicable to number crunching as well. Using this, data set anomaly spotting or comprehension overall could all be enhanced.


The team behind this idea is working to prove this by testing the theory using a recently built 129-loudspeaker array which has been installed in a giant immersive cube inside Virgina Tech's science lab/performance space, the Moss Art Center.


How researchers are testing their big data theory

The test subjects  being used are the data sets of earth's upper atmosphere where each bit of atmospheric data has been converted into a unique sound. These pieces of audio are varied by making use of changes in pitch, amplitude and volume.


The immersive Cube of the school contains one of the biggest multichannel audio systems in the world according to the university and sounds get produced in unique 360 degree 3D format.

Spatial and immersive representation of big data using sound is a rather unexplored area of research but it provides a very unique perspective. 


Source: HOB