Nand Kishor Contributor

Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc... ...

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Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc...

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Inside Mark Zuckerberg's vision for your Facebook augmented reality

By Nand Kishor |Email | Jun 2, 2017 | 5163 Views

MENLO PARK, Calif. - Mark Zuckerberg is sitting ramrod straight on the edge of a gray couch, sketching a vision of what Facebook will soon be like for its nearly 2 billion users.

A blank wall turns into a 3-D art display with an animated, infinite rainbow waterfall - just by holding up a smartphone and viewing it through the camera.

That future is now. This Millennial-inspired wall canvas is just a short distance from where the Facebook CEO is discussing his company's new camera platform before it opened up to software developers at the company's annual conference on Tuesday.

"There are groups of people just staring and admiring this wall which looks blank," Zuckerberg told USA TODAY from his glass-walled conference room at the heart of Facebook's sprawling campus here.

"That's going to be a thing in the future, all of this art all over the place. I think it's really neat," he said. "We even put a plaque up on the wall to commemorate it. It's one of the first pieces of augmented reality street art in the world."

The world's most populous social network is poised to create a generation of new apps that it's betting will catapult augmented reality into the mainstream, the same way it made personal status updates and viral mobile games part of the daily, unthinking habits of billions.

Fans of multi-player video game Mass Effect: Andromeda can don a Mass Effect-themed helmet mask effect for use with the front camera, then flip the camera to view stats from your latest mission using data from the game - basically a dynamic leader board in a 3-D space. You can also pan your phone to experience game visuals that augment the world around, bringing the scene from the game to life.

Soon fans will cheer on soccer team Manchester United with real-time data and video from the match. When ManU scores, it shows up in Facebook as a big flashing "GOALLLL" as you hear the roar of the crowd and confetti flies.

In his signature gray T-shirt and jeans, Zuckerberg, 32, is in the zone, describing this very near future that is deeply entwined with his view of how communication is evolving, from text to photo to video and now, digitally altered physical reality - all via the Facebook app on your smartphone.

Facebook has poured billions of dollars into artificial intelligence research and virtual reality development, including its $3 billion acquisition of pioneering virtual reality headset maker Oculus. Yet virtual reality hasn't really taken off yet, partially hobbled by the bulkiness of headsets and the expense of computing gear, as well as people's general unfamiliarity with it. Continue Reading>>

Source: USA Today